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Category:   E-Material
Subject:   NEW BOOK: Intelligent help systems for UNIX
From:   Prof Paul Mc Kevitt
Email:   P.McKevitt_(on)_ulst.ac.uk
Date received:   07 May 2001

LLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLL NEW BOOK: Intelligent help systems for UNIX LLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLL Edited by: Stephen J. Hegner (Umeaa University, Sweden) Paul Mc Kevitt (University of Ulster (Magee), Derry, Northern Ireland) Peter Norvig (Computational Sciences Division, Nasa Ames Research Center, USA) Robert Wilensky (Division of Computer Science, University of California at Berkeley, USA) ISBN-07923-6641-7 Boston, USA & Dordrecht, The Netherlands: Kluwer Academic Publishers, 2000 TO ORDER: WWW: http://www.wkap.nl/book.htm/0-7 923-6641-7 PRICE: US$ 190.00 (GBP 135, EUR 220) (ca. 424 pp. hb.) ______________________________________________________________________ In this international collection of papers there is a wealth of knowledge on artificial intelligence (AI) and cognitive science (CS) techniques applied to the problem of providing help systems for mainly the UNIX operating system. The research described here involves the representation of technical computer concepts, but also, the representation of how users conceptualise such concepts. The collection looks at computational models and systems such as UC, Yucca and OSCON programmed in languages such as Lisp, Prolog, OPS-5 and C which have been developed to provide UNIX help. These systems range from being menu-based to ones with natural language interfaces, some providing active help, intervening when they believe the user to have misconceptions, and some based on empirical studies of what users actually do while using UNIX. Further papers investigate planning and knowledge representation where the focus is on discovering what the user wants to do, and figuring out a way to do it as well as representing the knowledge needed to do so. There is a significant focus on natural language dialogue where consultation systems can become active, incorporating user modelling, natural language generation and plan recognition, modelling metaphors and users' mistaken beliefs. Lots can be learned from seeing how AI and CS techniques can be investigated in depth while being applied to a real test-bed domain like help on UNIX. ______________________________________________________________________ ABOUT THE AUTHORS: [all authors' biographies given here] TABLE OF CONTENTS: Introduction Stephen J. Hegner, Paul Mc Kevitt, Peter Norvig, Robert Wilensky PART I: computational models and systems Stephen J. Hegner, Paul Mc Kevitt, Peter Norvig, Robert Wilensky "An intelligent human-computer interface for provision of on-line help" Jennifer Jerrams-Smith Department of Information Systems, Portsmouth University, ENGLAND "Virtues and problems of an active help system for UNIX" Maria Virvou, John Jones, and Mark Millington Department of Computer Science, University of Piraeus, GREECE Department of Computer Science, University of Hull, ENGLAND Interactive Business Systems, Inc., Illinois, USA "The Berkeley UNIX consultant project" Robert Wilensky, David N. Chin, Marc Luria, James Martin, James Mayfield, and Dekai Wu Computer Science Division, Department of EECS, University of California at Berkeley, USA "The OSCON operating system consultant" Paul Mc Kevitt University of Ulster (Magee), Derry, NORTHERN IRELAND "USCSH: an active intelligent assistance system" Manton Matthews, Walter Pharr, Gauntam Biswas, and Harish Neelakandan Department of Computer Science, University of South Carolina, USA PART II: planning and knowledge representation Stephen J. Hegner, Paul Mc Kevitt, Peter Norvig, Robert Wilensky "The SINIX Consultant - towards a theoretical treatment of plan recognition" Matthias Hecking Lahnstein, GERMANY "Plan realization for complex command interaction in the UNIX help domain" Stephen J. Hegner Department of Computing Science, Umeaa University, SWEDEN "An assumption based truth maintenance system in active aid for UNIX users" John Jones, Mark Millington, Maria Virvou Department of Computer Science, University of Hull, ENGLAND Interactive Business Systems, Inc., Illinois, USA Department of Computer Science, University of Piraeus, GREECE "What do you know about mail? knowledge representation in the SINIX consultant" Christel Kemke Technical Faculty, University of Bielefeld, GERMANY PART III: natural language dialogue Stephen J. Hegner, Paul Mc Kevitt, Peter Norvig, Robert Wilensky "Planning intelligent responses in a NL system" David N. Chin Department of Information and Computer Sciences, University of Hawaii at Manoa, USA "Strategies for expressing concise, helpful answers" David N. Chin Department of Information and Computer Sciences, University of Hawaii at Manoa, USA "Evaluating plan recognition systems: three properties of a good explanation" James Mayfield Applied Physics Laboratory, Johns Hopkins University, USA "Representing Unix Domain Metaphors" James Martin Department of Computer Science, University of Colorado, Boulder, USA "Using justification patterns to advise novice UNIX users" Alex Quilici Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Hawaii at Manoa, USA ______________________________________________________________________________ ABOUT THE EDITORS: Stephen J. Hegner received the Ph.D. degree in Computer and Information Science from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, USA in 1977. Currently, he is a senior lecturer in the Department of Computing Science at Umeå University, Sweden. His areas of professional interest focus on algorithmic aspects of knowledge representation and inference in database and knowledge-base systems. Professor Paul Mc Kevitt is 37 and from D/un Na nGall (Donegal), IRELAND on the Northwest of the EU. He is Chair in Intelligent MultiMedia at the School of Computing & Intelligent Systems, Faculty of Informatics, University of Ulster (Magee College), Derry (Londonderry), Northern Ireland. Previously, he was Associate Professor (Senior Lecturer) in the School of Computer Science at The Queen's University of Belfast, Northern Ireland. He has been Visiting Professor of Intelligent MultiMedia Computing in the Institute of Electronic Systems at Aalborg University, Denmark and a British EPSRC (Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council) Advanced Fellow in the Department of Computer Science at the University of Sheffield, England. The Fellowship, commenced in 1994, and released him from his Associate Professorship (tenured Lecturership) for 5 years to conduct full-time research on the integration of natural language, speech and vision processing. He completed a Master's degree in Education (M.Ed.) at the University of Sheffield in 1999. He completed his Ph.D. in Computer Science at the University of Exeter, England in 1991. His Master's degree in Computer Science (M.S.) was obtained from New Mexico State University, New Mexico, USA in 1988 and his Bachelor's degree in Computer Science (B.Sc., Hons.) from University College Dublin (UCD), Ireland in 1985. His primary research interests are in Natural Language Processing (NLP) including the processing of pragmatics, beliefs and intentions in dialogue. He is also interested in Philosophy, MultiMedia and the general area of Artificial Intelligence. Peter Norvig received a B.S. in Applied Mathematics from Brown University, USA and a Ph.D. in Computer Science from the University of California at Berkeley, USA. He has been a Professor at the University of Southern California and a Research Faculty Member at Berkeley. He has over forty publications in various areas of Computer Science, concentrating on Artificial Intelligence, Natural Language Processing and Software Engineering. He has also served as a Senior or Chief Scientist at Sun Microsystems Labs, Harlequin Inc. and Junglee Corp., and is currently Chief of the Computational Sciences Division at NASA Ames Research Center. Robert Wilensky received his B.A. in Mathematics and his Ph.D. from Yale University, USA. In 1978, he joined the faculty of the University of California at Berkeley, USA where he is now Professor in the Division of Computer Science, and in the School of Information Management and Systems. He has served as Chair of the Computer Science Division, the director of BAIR, the Berkeley Artificial Intelligence Research Project, and the director of Berkeley Cognitive Science Program. Professor Wilensky has published numerous articles and books in the area of artificial intelligence, planning, knowledge representation, natural language processing, and digital information systems. He is currently Principal Investigator of UC Berkeley's Digital Library Project. ______________________________________________________________________________ ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS: Susan Jones (Kluwer Humanities and Social Sciences Division) Andr/e Diepenbroek (Kluwer Desk Editor, Editorial Department) Jacqueline Bergsma (Kluwer Inhouse Editor, Humanities and Social Sciences) Melanie Willow (Kluwer Journals Editorial Office) LLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLL NEW BOOK: Intelligent help systems for UNIX LLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLL
 

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